It Is Never Too Early to Start Bat Mitzvah Planning

Religious rites of passage are significant life moments for those of deep faith. Some can occur at any life-stage, such as a baptism ritual, or for those of a certain age, such as the sacrament of confirmation. A Jewish boy’s bar mitzvah and a girl’s bat mitzvah ceremonies, where children assume the religious responsibilities of adulthood, take place when he reaches 13, and she 12 or 13.

The event may be a multifaceted one, with family gatherings before and party celebrations after the ceremony. As such, the weekend requires extensive preparation and planning. Even taking into account variations, some generalities can be applied. Using a bat mitzvah as an example, the following guidelines can help a family prepare for the big day.

Calendar

Three or four years before your child will be of age, reach out to representatives at your local place of worship. Because you may find that the calendar for your synagogue or temple fills more quickly than you had imagined, you must schedule the bat mitzvah well in advance. Welcome directions and guidance provided by the experienced service planners. You will learn not only about timelines and necessary tasks, but you will plan for your child’s intensive study period the year before the ceremony.

Budget

Before proceeding with planning, decide how much you want to spend. Bat mitzvah festivities can be as elaborate as a wedding’s, with costs commensurate with those of that affair. Try not to focus on competing with others; your bat mitzvah should be personal and reflective of your values. Preparing will be stressful enough without your spending far beyond your means.

Guest List

One of the more challenging and sensitive matters is that of narrowing the number of attendees. Create a tentative list that you can manipulate as you focus your planning. You have to decide how personal you want to make the event. Have your daughter provide input about peer invitees. It may make sense to invite her entire school grade if the class is small enough. You, the parent, decide on the list of relatives.

Party Plans

Once you have an idea of potential numbers, you will discover the importance of starting early. The time comes to contact a venue or an event planner to prepare for the party that follows; because the capacity of a building may dictate the number of guests, you may find it more practical to reverse the order and begin guest planning only after this step. Additionally, you will have to arrange accommodations by reserving hotel-room blocks, which could be challenging if hotels have scheduled other events at the time.

You will have to make entertainment and ambiance choices. Will you provide live music or a DJ? What will be your party theme? Will you offer special menus?

Ceremony Preparation

At some point, you will process the actual bat mitzvah with the rabbi. The tone, guidelines, and actual rules for the ceremony will depend on how liberal or conservative is the domination. While your child studies through the synagogue or school or both, family members will likely partake in education at the same time. You may find yourself delving into extensive readings or participating in a few classes.

Consider your options for documenting the ceremony, taking into account any institutional restrictions. While photography and videography are traditional enhancements, give consideration to the modern testament of live streaming a bat mitzvah, both to record the event and expand the reach to participants. Finally, plan for the distribution of programs, yarmulkes, or other enhancement items, especially for non-Jewish guests.

Every detail counts when planning a religious ceremony to mark a significant spiritual moment. A bat or bar mitzvah will embed memories that every participant will reference in years to come, in particular your child, the center-of-attention; more importantly, careful planning will ensure the event features the appropriate mixture of gravitas and joy that is called for.

Meet the Author

Karie Herring

Karie Herring rambles of a former life in Phoenix, AZ while raising a teen and tween twins in their new home in Orlando, FL. She has been featured in AOL Money & Finance, Betty Confidential and Career School Now. She's a full-time technical writer, functional fitness athlete, overachieving wife and mom. She loves talking about maneuvering motherhood, womanhood, and her passion for essential oils and natural living.

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